Archive for the ‘Bodyweight Training’ Category

Martial Power Workshops

October 31, 2010

Owning a dumb body is like owning outdated software. Close to useless. Only worse, cos with your own body you’re talking serious or TERMINAL hurt.

And in competition or in conflict, a dumb body spells danger for you and danger for your buddies. You’re a walking liability.

Well, what if there was such a thing as a “Smart Body?”

smart body—programmed with state-of-the-art neuro-software guaranteed to rocket your power, strength and speed far beyond its original capability?

And what if you could get hold of these neuro-software secrets yourself and:

IN YOUR VERY FIRST DAY, INSTANTLY GAIN
A 30% OR GREATER INCREASE IN YOUR STRENGTH AND POWER!

Can you imagine? The same day you learn them—secrets that make you immediately 30% stronger and faster.

For the first time in Australia I will be running workshops specifically for martial artists, combining Pavel’s world famous hard-hitting combat secrets from the Russian Spec Ops with his gold standard Russian Kettlebell system.

Learn:

  • Why the mastery of progressive calisthenics is the secret to raw strength and power through the forgotten art of bodyweight training.
  • Discover how a simple push up can double your punching power when done correctly.
  • The futility of gym machines and the charade of high rep low weight bodybuilding training when it comes to power and speed.
  • Unlock the 6 rules for power packed push ups and the hidden benefits of this lost exercise.
  • 15 secrets to impeccable squatting and how the bodyweight squat will do more for your kicking than barbell squats.
  • Discover the magic of GTG – Grease the Groove – to develop crushing power using the RKC principles of strength.

Combine this with the RKC system for kettlebell training to learn:

  • Understand why mastery of the kettlebell swing will give you stamina and resilience.
  • Learn how to recruit the powerful lat as a core muscle, to protect your spine and add power to your punching and kicking.
  • The concept of rooting and how to use it to increase your striking power.
  • The two hundred year history of the Get Up and its uses for combat sports.
  • Develop simultaneous mobility and stability to develop awesome power.

These two workshops are being run for the first time ever in Australia in Brisbane and Melbourne on December 18 and 19. Due to the amount of information contained these are five hour workshops running from 10am to 3pm. For more details see the website, for Brisbane click here and for Melbourne click here.

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Convict Conditioning

March 18, 2010

Paul Wade’s Convict Conditioning has now claimed the #2 spot on Dragon Door’s prestigious Top 10 List, just four months after its publication—a phenomenal achievement and a great testament to the quality of its training advice.

The early adopters of Convict Conditioning have now posted 149 reviews of a title that is rapidly being hailed as an Instant Classic.

Here are typical comments:

Master your body!
In 2 weeks, using just the beginning steps of this program, I have seen a dramatic increase in grip strength, usable upper body strength, and even noticeable changes in body composition. It’s a dynamite book, a masterful and complete program, and results WILL happen!!!Christof Harper – Davis CA

Brutal Elegance.
I have been training and reading about training since I first joined the US Navy in the 1960s. I thought I’d seen everything the fitness world had to offer. Sometimes twice. But I was wrong. This book is utterly iconoclastic.I have read virtually every calisthenics book printed in America over the last 40 years, and instruction like this can’t be found anywhere, in any one of them. Convict Conditioning is head and shoulders above them all.– Albany, NY, United States

Who should purchase this volume? Everyone who craves fitness and strength should. I’d advise any athlete to obtain this work as soon as possible.–Bill Oliver

Thank you Coach Wade for creating the perfect blueprint to build a truly functional body.
If only this book was available when I first thought it was time to start using dumbbells and barbells 20 years ago?!—Shawn Reed – Pittsburgh, PA

An UNBELIEVABLE superstrength manual
My training partner turned me onto this book. I really, really, really love the contents of this book. All the prison-based stuff aside, the method itself is something beyond belief. My mom could pick this up and start tomorrow at her own level and so could a world class strength pro! Stunning. A magical, once in a life-time training manual. If it inspires and informs you the way it did for me, you’ll gladly pay ten times the cover price, I PROMISE.—Mike C – Corpus Christi, South Texas

Beyond The Hype
I was astonished by the volume of data in this book, and a huge amount of it has changed the way I look at training altogether. I commend Dragon Door for having the guts to publish this man’s work. The book is a rare, wonderful find; the kind of jewel of a book you can really use and learn from, which only comes along a few times in your life. The book really is a complete encyclopedia of a massive and incredibly sophisticated training system. Buy, borrow, loan or steal this book, and you’ll still be reading (and using) it ten, twenty years from now. Wonderful stuff!Greg A – CA USA

I’ve packed all of my other training books away!
I read CC in one go. I couldn’t put it down. I have purchased a lot of bodyweight training books in the past, and have always been pretty disappointed. But not with this one. The information in this book is AWESOME! I like to have a clear, logical plan of progression to follow, and that is what this book gives. I have put all of my other training books away. CC is the only system I am going to follow.—
Lyndan – Australia

A must for all martial artists
As a dedicated martial artist for more than seven years, this book is exactly what I’ve been looking for. Finally this book has come along. At last I can combine perfect body movement for martial skill with perfect body exercise for ultimate strength. This book is a complete textbook on how to max out your musclepower using only body movement, as different from dumbbells, machines or gadgets. For this reason it belongs on the bookshelf of every serious martial artist, male and female, young and old.Gino Cartier – Washington DC US

Old school for the new revolution
This is a great book. The best part about this book is the 10 steps to mastery. These steps alone are worth the price of the book 10 fold. This is a MUST HAVE BOOK.—eddie sanders – Raleigh, NC USA

A Real Break-out Book on Strength Training
No doubt, the best book I have read on bodyweight training & I have several dozen on my bookshelf.—Mike – Orange,Calif. USA

Brilliant
This is the exercise regime I’ve been waiting 30 years for: easy build up, highlights weak spots without over-stressing (i.e. avoids injury), practice virtually any where, no equipment to buy or lug around, very accessibly written. Brilliant!Norman Duff – Seattle, WA USA

Really good value
Nobody is going to complain about the value of this book. As someone fairly new to training, it’s all in here, everything from warm-ups and programs to every exercise under the sun, plus guidelines on how to move forwards. Sell your gym membership and six second abs machine and buy this book. It’ll actually save you money.Tania Gould – Portland OR USA

Great tool and reminder of “total body mastery”
This is a phenomenal book and a book I bought and also gifted proudly to others, including family members, and I do like my family —Philippe Til Tomaszewski – Los Angeles, California

Finally the prison system DELIVERS!!!
As a hardcore bodybuilder and a longtime fan of strength training, I was skeptical when I first received this book as a christmas gift from an American friend of mine. But what can I say? Clear, entertaining and amazingly logical. The book will become a Classic for raw strength purists who will love it greatly.J.C. Marrin – Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada

Power to the prisoners?
This book really, really, REALLY does deliver. Once I’d read page one I knew I was hooked and read the rest in pretty much one go. There was waaay too much to take in, so I’m going to be reading it again (and again) through the weeks to come. Once I got my skull round the coach’s basic idea-that body-weight work should be used for muscle and power, not stamina-the rest of the book was a real eye opener. It’s changed EVERYTHING for me. But be prepared to hate yourself for not having this book when you started your training. Another unbeleivably hi quality book from the people at Dragon Door. Well done.Chris Machin – Boulder, CO

This book is fantastic
I can’t speak highly enough of this book. It is jamed packed with useful bodyweight exercise information. Nothing more need be said if you are looking to get strong and healthy for life. Every important exercise is detailed completely. It is a throughly understandable good read. In my opinion one cannot go wrong if one buys this book.Mike N. – BLF Hills, MI USA

This Is A Great Book
I have read many books over the years on physical culture-weights, odd objects, body weight, you name it. CC is the best one I’ve come across. Its a gold mine of information that will never be obsolete. I applaud John for making it happen and would look forward to any other material from Coach Wade.—Steve – Florida,USA

To purchase a copy of Convict Conditioning go here.

Training a World Champ

January 10, 2010

On the 8th of November, 2009, Sophia McDermott became the first Australian female to win a world championship in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. At thirty years of age she has spent most of her life training to compete in a variety of sports – first was five years of ballet and tap dancing, just like any little girl. Then came her first love of gymnastics. Competing for ten years, both Sophia and her twin sister Elizabeth were top national level gymnasts. However, a separated shoulder finished off her gymnastics career and that was when her life changed completely.

 She began training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Melbourne, Australia in 2000. Quickly becoming the top national level female she moved to the United States to train at Rigan Machado’s Academy before being the only girl ever invited to train full-time at the Rickson Gracie Academy. Now training at Robert Drysdale’s school In Las Vegas and as the reigning no Gi World Champ she has come a long way.

 As a brown belt she is often less experienced than the women she competes against and has sought to make the difference up with conditioning. I have known Sophia for over ten years and had the chance to meet up with her in the US in June 2009 after I completed the RKC. She had suffered another bad shoulder injury shortly before this at the World Championships.

 After speaking with her for a while it became quickly apparent that what she needed to do was find a method of strength training that wouldn’t tire her out much so she could continue her skills practice on the mat. With a standard week consisting of ten hours of BJJ plus another two hours of either wrestling or Judo this isn’t as easy as it sounds. Skills pay the bills and already having a skill deficit means that she needs to concentrate her efforts on BJJ training and not conditioning.

 As much as you’re all probably thinking that this is where I introduced her to the kettlebell and the rest just fell into place that would be wrong. In fact, I spent a lot of time giving her my reasons why she should stay away from any form of external resistance training.

 For starters, she competes right at the top of her weight class and has to diet very strictly to get under weight to compete. Adding weight to her frame would just make this harder. Secondly, with a history of shoulder problems I had a good idea that while she was very strong, she wasn’t using her body correctly. To me, there is little point in adding external resistance if the person isn’t even able to hold their body correctly. So the start of our training would need to focus on rehab for the AC joint as well as strength in preparation for the Worlds.

 In Hardstyle we are taught to pack the shoulders – to always work as if we are trying to stand with good posture, no matter the position we are in. This packing of the shoulders, or pulling the shoulder blades down and back creates space in the AC joint. With a history of shoulder impingement it was important that we work on ways to keep the shoulders healthy to withstand the stresses of daily training. This was going to be accomplished by creating better thoracic movement by integrating some Z drills into her warm ups plus getting her back to basics with her strength training.

 Taking direction from the Naked Warrior I taught her how to hold a push up position while keeping her posture tight with shoulders packed in. She was quite surprised at the difference in feel for how it should feel versus what she had been doing her whole life. Once she had mastered the static hold we added in movement just as described in Naked Warrior– action in both directions, pulling down to the bottom of the push up and then pushing the floor away on the way up while maintaining the packed shoulder position. At this point I could see light bulbs clicking on and off in her head as she came to realizations about the way she created movement. Not only that but with her posture held correctly she was able to work pain free!

Once she had come to terms with only being able to do a few push ups at a time we went to work on full body tension. She has now gotten so good at these push ups she is able to do one arm push ups!

Her full training plan actually follows a template set out by Kenneth Jay in
Viking Warrior Conditioning
. She performs three main exercises – one arm push ups, pistols and chin ups. She performs each of these twice per week over the course of three workouts. So workout one may be push ups and chins, workout two chins and pistols with the final workout being push ups and pistols. Sets and reps are kept low to minimize fatigue and muscle soreness. She performs three to five sets of 3-5 reps per exercise. The chin ups are performed explosively with a slow negative.

While I’m speaking of Viking Warrior Conditioning I’ll also add in that it’s my secret weapon that I’ve used this year with many BJJ competitors. However, not many of them are able to use kettlebells well enough, and with my time limited when I work with them, we have replaced snatches with either sprawl/burpees or squat thrusts. In Sophia’s case we used squat thrusts (and hill sprints on alternate workouts) as I didn’t trust her to be able to keep good shoulder placement during such a fast movement. We followed the same interval sequence as in phase one of VWC – 15:15 going for a maximum of 20 minutes. With tournament BJJ matches for brown/black belts only lasting ten minutes this would give her adequate conditioning.

She was amazed at the level of conditioning she was able to attain with such a limited training plan. None of her workouts exceeded thirty-five minutes, including the conditioning part, and she was able to fight through all her matches with plenty of gas in the tank. Her bodyweight stayed low while retaining the strength necessary to move her opponents around.

It may seem too simple to be effective, but then that’s the sort of comment I’ve come to expect from using Hardstyle methods with my clients. The funny thing is, that while others may question the training, few can argue with the results! There are plenty of people who claim they get remarkable results with their athletes and claim to train big names. But Sophia is Australia’s only ever BJJ world champ, and she trains chooses to train with the best – Dragon Door Australia. Don’t make the mistake of using someone inferior for your combat sport preparation.

The First Step

December 14, 2009

Confucius said that “Even a journey of a thousand steps begins with the smallest step”.

In the world of training most people skip the first step and try to go directly to something fancy, fun and impressive looking.

So much of our training life is spent trying to gain strength and fitness, but is it what we really need? Most people could really benefit from gaining some extra movement skill, joint mobility and flexibility first. What good is loading up a squat if you can only squat half depth with poor form?

And so the continuum of training should be: mobility, stability, strength and then finally conditioning. If I could liken it to a car imagine having a car with bald tires, wheels out of line, no brakes and dodgy suspension. Then we drop a new engine in the car and take it to the track. It’s great going in a straight line but what happens when you arrive at turn 1 faster than you’ve ever been before with no brakes, wheels wobbling all over the place and a car that won’t steer?

If that is your body you wind up hurt.

Wouldn’t it make more sense to put new tires on your car, get the wheels balanced, new suspension and a full service before dropping a new engine in?

In the realm of training, learning how to stabilise a load is pretty much the first thing that is expected of a client. As soon as anyone, whether they are in shape or not, enters a gym they are expected to lift weights. But if someone isn’t able to stand with good posture, or walk with the body held in good alignment then how can they be expected to keep proper alignment when lifting an external load?

Andrew Lock, physiotherapist to the stars has said that bodyweight training is like the primary school of physical training. Without developing these essential skills that we can use for the rest of our lives everything else we do is compromised. As Grey Cook says “there is no point stacking fitness on dysfunction”.

If bodyweight is essential skills and similar to primary school then barbells and dumbbells are like high school. A big step forward. But again, if you can’t achieve a full controlled movement, pain-free with just bodyweight what point is there in adding load? So while resistance training is a great tool it is a further step up the chain.

The final step is university level movement skills. And this is where kettlebells come in. By having to be balanced in an extra plane they create a much bigger demand on postural awareness and dynamic balance. Where barbells and dumbbells only have to be lifted against gravity which only works straight up and down, the kettlebells has to be balanced in a forward and backward manner because of its pendulous nature.

So the very first thing people should do is to take a look at well thought out bodyweight training programs. One of the best known bodyweight training books in the world is Pavel Tsatsouline’s Naked Warrior. This has been the number two best seller on Amazon.com’s fitness books list! It’s available now through Dragon Door Australia. Don’t waste another second on performing training that your body is ill prepared for. Learn the secrets of full body tension, muscle irradiation and how to protect your spine and shoulders during dynamic movement.

Contact us now or visit the website for more details.